Zero Moment of Truth

  In Week 7, we watched and discussed McDonald’s Canada’s “Our Food Your Questions” program. Prof @qkyujinshim taught us about how messages should be self-serving, transparent radically and be real-time relevant. This reminded me of a similar campaign done by McDonald’s Singapore through brand journalism in making their fast food hipster/restaurant worthy.

This video taps on the zero moment of truth as many viewers have already eaten McDonald’s multiple times and the imaginative possibility of constructing their own or following the ‘hacks’ would impact their decision making process when they are choosing between fast food or are looking for an enjoyable experience.

Here’s a similar campaign to the one by McDonald’s Canada, done in Singapore:

IKEA: Traditional Ad. vs. Online Content

In class, we watched an IKEA ad to show the differences between traditional media and digital media. I felt that it was interesting and inspiring for IKEA to make their “makeover ideas” video with elements of traditional media seen in how it builds the brand image.

IKEA subtly communicates that it is a progressive company through treating the gay and african-american couple as any other family unit and couple. This will be received well by customers who are sensitive to such social issues and build more brand affinity as they will see IKEA as a representative of their beliefs and values. 

Brand Journalism – yay or nay?

I came across this online article which is relevant to our class discussion on 14 March.

… we have no interest in working with content creators. Journalism is a calling and people are putting trust in you to study something and make a judgement. But if it’s someone who is getting money from a company to write five articles saying how awesome something is. Will anyone read that? No of course not. 

I think that brand journalism will continue to be a communications strategy in the near future. The rise of fake news and proliferation of sites such as States Times Review show that more often than not, people do not question the credibility and reliability of the author. In Singapore, even when branded content on popular sites such as Seth Lui and The Smart Local include a disclaimer at the end of the article that it is a partnership / transaction with the featured client, online users continue to share the article as the uniqueness of the overall story matters more than whether it is exaggerated than what it actually is.